Resources

One of the  things we've observed is that so people become patients or caregivers overnight. As such, we often aren't equipped to handle new caregiving situations and need to learn new skills. Our goal is to provide you with focused, high quality information from trusted sources. We will be adding to the content library and would love to hear from you on topics you would like to see here by sharing your thoughts.

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Food and Eating
Tips for for food preparation

Tips for for food preparation

Tips for healthy food options and time saving habits to avoid being overwhelmed for the person you care for.

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How to take stress out of mealtime

How to take stress out of mealtime

Caring for someone who needs help at mealtime can be stressful. They may not want to eat, or maybe they’re complaining about the meal. The issues around mealtime can vary, so here are some tips to get mealtime back on track

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Supporting food intake

Supporting food intake

Many health issues and medications can lead to reduced appetite, making mealtime a source of frustration for both caregivers and those they’re caring for. Lack of appetite may make it challenging to maintain adequate nutrition. These tips can help.

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Driving and transportation

Having the driving conversation

Have a conversation early on if there are any concerns about driving safety. Indications that it might be time to have the driving conversation include starting new medications that affect cognition, worsening eyesight, or other physical limitations that could make driving unsafe.

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Finances

Having the financial conversation

Understanding the financial situation of the person you care for will make you better prepared when potential issues arise. Start the conversation by asking if they have plans in place for unexpected medical costs.

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Medication

What to know about supplements

Supplement is a broad term used for herbs, minerals, vitamins, etc. taken to support or enhance health or nutrition. It is essential to be aware that these are not regulated in the same way pharmaceutical medications are.

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What to watch for with new medications

These steps will help make sure that medications are taken safely and appropriately

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Tips for managing medications

Regardless of how much support is needed by the person you’re caring for, having a medication management system is important. Setting up a medication schedule and adding reminders can help make sure you stay on track with medications.

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Caregiver burden and stress

Making time for yourself as a caregiver

Here are some evidence-based tips to help avoid burnout.

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Home safety

Returning home safely

Returning home after a procedure or hospitalization can be new territory for everyone involved. You can avoid confusion and stress by having the medication list, care instructions, and contact list for the person you’re caring for easily accessible. These documents will help you feel more prepared and help to keep the person you're caring for safe during their recovery.

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Making home safe

Our ability to move around safely at home can change after a new diagnosis or surgery, as we age, or when we’re taking certain medications. As a caregiver, you can help to spot potential tripping hazards or identify ways to make using the bathroom safer and easier for the person you’re caring for.

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Bathing

Tips for getting people to bathe

Bathing is an important part of daily living. For some, a change in the ability to bathe independently may be viewed as a normal part of aging. For others, it may be very distressing to require assistance.

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How to bathe safely

Bathing is an important part of daily living. For some, a change in the ability to bathe independently may be viewed as a normal part of aging. For others, it may be very distressing to require bathing assistance. For those helping with bathing or hygiene tasks, a variety of emotions and concerns are normal.

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Dressing

Tips for helping a loved one get dressed

When the person you're caring for needs help dressing, it's important to communicate early and often about preferences. Clothing that is easy to put on and manage and that fits well is important for safety.

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How to use dressing time to look for issues

Helping someone get dressed is an opportunity to notice new physical and mental problems as well as to observe changes over time. Helping with dressing is also an important opportunity to identify new or worsening issues. Addressing these changes as soon as possible may improve long-term outcomes.

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Transferring

Proper transferring techniques to avoid injury

If you’re caring for someone who needs assistance getting in and out of bed or to their wheelchair and back, you need to know how to do that safely, without causing injury. At times, being moved, moving improperly, or staying in one position for too long can cause tears in the skin or ulcers.

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How to transfer from a bed to a wheelchair

There are many reasons the person you’re caring for may need a wheelchair. The way you transfer someone from the bed to the wheelchair may vary based on why the wheelchair is needed.

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Incontinence

Tips to reduce the stress of incontinence caregiving

If you care for someone with incontinence, you may find it stressful or frustrating. You are not alone--in fact, many caregivers share your feelings. Incontinence can be a source of stress and embarrassment for the person receiving care as well.

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Treatment options for urinary incontinence

Treatment plans for urinary incontinence vary, and a plan could include medications, surgeries, devieces, or physical therapy. It’s important to know that you have options.

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How to provide emotional support to someone with incontinence

No one wants to experience incontinence or have to deal with the effects of it. Before approaching anyone about incontinence, consider how you would want to be approached.

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Remote caregiving

Managing health and health care remotely

Easy access to medical information before you need it is the best way to avoid complications and annoyances when the caregivers aren't all in the same place.

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How to help the primary caregiver

One of the most supportive things you can do as a remote caregiver is to offer the primary caregiver a break.

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Het organized for long-distance caregiving

Caregiving for someone that doesn't live close by can be challenging.

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Caregiver confidence

How to ask for what you need

It can be challenging to figure out where to start, whether faced with a new diagnosis or establishing care.

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Financial support for caregivers

Ways to save on healthcare and caregiving expenses

Caregiving can add to your out-of-pocket costs if you need to help with groceries or even take time off from work. There are programs designed to help relieve this burden:

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Mental health

Managing mental health and mental health treatments

According to the CDC, 1 in 6 adults will experience depression and it affects 16 million adults in the US every year. Depression can affect anyone, from any background, at any age.

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End of life

What to consider for end of life planning

Start by having an honest conversation with the people you love. Let them know what the most important thing is for you when you think about your end of life.

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